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“Freedom of expression irrigated with the youth’s bloods,” Deputy MoIC

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“Freedom of expression irrigated with the youth’s bloods,” Deputy MoIC

 Reporters without border in its new researches posed Afghanistan at the 122th position of freedom of expression during the last 13 years, after conducting a research among some 180 world countries recently.

Deputy minister of information and culture on publication affairs, Simin Hasanzada in a special interview with The Kabul Times called freedom of expression one of the Afghan government’s significant and valuable achievements during the last 13 years, with the ministry of information and culture providing main media principles and practical ground for the development in the society. 
“While the country’s entire cultural infrastructures have been destroyed, the ministry of information and culture, like other organs could revitalize and resume its new life from zero,” she said.
The ministry of information and culture, with the former leadership, could provide draft law for the freedom of expression and presented to the house of people, with the then president endorsing after receiving the house approval in 2005, Hsanzada added.
The deputy minister went on to say, “with approval and implementation of the law, the way was paved for the new cultural, social and political life of the society, where various printing and audio-visual media could get operational hoping for further development.”
Some 900 printing and over 300, audio-visual media and more than 10 news   See P3
agencies could get operational, reflecting the people demands, Hasanzada continued.
Giving details about the issue, the deputy minister said despites eye-catching development and progress in media affairs, journalists faced harsh challenges including tough insecurity, unsafe work areas, culture of using illegal power and other pressures in the last 13 years. “In some cases, some journalists’ failure to abide by the journalism norms and ethics created critical challenges before journalistic activities.”
Calling freedom of expression as the main achievements of the people of Afghanistan, the deputy minister went on as saying, “Freedom of Expression is irrigated by the country’s youth blood. This [freedom of expression] would never be extinguished even never get restricted.”
The people of Afghanistan ask for institutionalization of freedom of expression and this is the responsibility of the government of Afghanistan, particularly, the ministry of information and culture to do their best in practicing the goal, said Hasanzada.
She praised the state-run media for its playing key role in monitoring the government performances alongside the private media and reflecting developments and failure of the government in any spheres.
The government dailies are like archived documentaries that help the youths at any times get access to any speeches of the country’s leaders if willing, added the deputy minister who asked for not only their removal but for additional support and financial aids by the government and the related organs.
Hasanzada lauded the government dailies for their struggle in reflecting the exact activities of the government and filling gaps between the people and the government, as he blamed some private media for exceeding beyond the country’s situations alongside their success to become mirrors of the government success and defections.
Naming each of the government dailies, with specified publications routine—The Anis—political, Hiwad—economic and Islah—national and social, she said the youths could get their favorite articles.
As the country’s only English paper, The Kabul Times is the expressive language of the Afghan government to the world, said Hasanzada.
According to her, law on access rights to information had been indorsed through a gathering attended by the journalist units, civil society and experts and with the soon approval the motive behind violence and threat against media works had been removed.
She asked the media for not missing time to release the law endorsement for soon practicing and urging for the release through the audio-visual and printing media. Journalists’ supporting fund has also been set within the ministry of information and culture, with the country’s national traders asked for financial support.
So far, the first-vice president granted some $10,000, Ata Mohammad, Balkh Governor donating $5,000 and Ofuq-e-Sharq Company to fund box and other institutions also provided some required cashes.
The deputy minister lauded the female journalists activities incomparable to those in some regional countries such as Iran, Bangladesh and Korea, as she blamed insecurity discrimination and lack of attention to the women rights to be behind their failure to work in media sphere.
But, in the neighboring countries, she said the women are admired as one of the key member of the society, she said expressing hope for more women active role in different fields.
Reporters without border in its new researches posed Afghanistan at the 122th position of freedom of expression during the last 13 years, after conducting a research among some 180 world countries recently.
Deputy minister of information and culture on publication affairs, Simin Hasanzada in a special interview with The Kabul Times called freedom of expression one of the Afghan government’s significant and valuable achievements during the last 13 years, with the ministry of information and culture providing main media principles and practical ground for the development in the society. 
“While the country’s entire cultural infrastructures have been destroyed, the ministry of information and culture, like other organs could revitalize and resume its new life from zero,” she said.
The ministry of information and culture, with the former leadership, could provide draft law for the freedom of expression and presented to the house of people, with the then president endorsing after receiving the house approval in 2005, Hsanzada added.
The deputy minister went on to say, “with approval and implementation of the law, the way was paved for the new cultural, social and political life of the society, where various printing and audio-visual media could get operational hoping for further development.”
Some 900 printing and over 300, audio-visual media and more than 10 news   See P3
agencies could get operational, reflecting the people demands, Hasanzada continued.
Giving details about the issue, the deputy minister said despites eye-catching development and progress in media affairs, journalists faced harsh challenges including tough insecurity, unsafe work areas, culture of using illegal power and other pressures in the last 13 years. “In some cases, some journalists’ failure to abide by the journalism norms and ethics created critical challenges before journalistic activities.”
Calling freedom of expression as the main achievements of the people of Afghanistan, the deputy minister went on as saying, “Freedom of Expression is irrigated by the country’s youth blood. This [freedom of expression] would never be extinguished even never get restricted.”
The people of Afghanistan ask for institutionalization of freedom of expression and this is the responsibility of the government of Afghanistan, particularly, the ministry of information and culture to do their best in practicing the goal, said Hasanzada.
She praised the state-run media for its playing key role in monitoring the government performances alongside the private media and reflecting developments and failure of the government in any spheres.
The government dailies are like archived documentaries that help the youths at any times get access to any speeches of the country’s leaders if willing, added the deputy minister who asked for not only their removal but for additional support and financial aids by the government and the related organs.
Hasanzada lauded the government dailies for their struggle in reflecting the exact activities of the government and filling gaps between the people and the government, as he blamed some private media for exceeding beyond the country’s situations alongside their success to become mirrors of the government success and defections.
Naming each of the government dailies, with specified publications routine—The Anis—political, Hiwad—economic and Islah—national and social, she said the youths could get their favorite articles.
As the country’s only English paper, The Kabul Times is the expressive language of the Afghan government to the world, said Hasanzada.
According to her, law on access rights to information had been indorsed through a gathering attended by the journalist units, civil society and experts and with the soon approval the motive behind violence and threat against media works had been removed.
She asked the media for not missing time to release the law endorsement for soon practicing and urging for the release through the audio-visual and printing media. Journalists’ supporting fund has also been set within the ministry of information and culture, with the country’s national traders asked for financial support.
So far, the first-vice president granted some $10,000, Ata Mohammad, Balkh Governor donating $5,000 and Ofuq-e-Sharq Company to fund box and other institutions also provided some required cashes.
The deputy minister lauded the female journalists activities incomparable to those in some regional countries such as Iran, Bangladesh and Korea, as she blamed insecurity discrimination and lack of attention to the women rights to be behind their failure to work in media sphere.
But, in the neighboring countries, she said the women are admired as one of the key member of the society, she said expressing hope for more women active role in different fields.
 
 
Reporters without border in its new researches posed Afghanistan at the 122th position of freedom of expression during the last 13 years, after conducting a research among some 180 world countries recently.
Deputy minister of information and culture on publication affairs, Simin Hasanzada in a special interview with The Kabul Times called freedom of expression one of the Afghan government’s significant and valuable achievements during the last 13 years, with the ministry of information and culture providing main media principles and practical ground for the development in the society. 
“While the country’s entire cultural infrastructures have been destroyed, the ministry of information and culture, like other organs could revitalize and resume its new life from zero,” she said.
The ministry of information and culture, with the former leadership, could provide draft law for the freedom of expression and presented to the house of people, with the then president endorsing after receiving the house approval in 2005, Hsanzada added.
The deputy minister went on to say, “with approval and implementation of the law, the way was paved for the new cultural, social and political life of the society, where various printing and audio-visual media could get operational hoping for further development.”
Some 900 printing and over 300, audio-visual media and more than 10 news   See P3
agencies could get operational, reflecting the people demands, Hasanzada continued.
Giving details about the issue, the deputy minister said despites eye-catching development and progress in media affairs, journalists faced harsh challenges including tough insecurity, unsafe work areas, culture of using illegal power and other pressures in the last 13 years. “In some cases, some journalists’ failure to abide by the journalism norms and ethics created critical challenges before journalistic activities.”
Calling freedom of expression as the main achievements of the people of Afghanistan, the deputy minister went on as saying, “Freedom of Expression is irrigated by the country’s youth blood. This [freedom of expression] would never be extinguished even never get restricted.”
The people of Afghanistan ask for institutionalization of freedom of expression and this is the responsibility of the government of Afghanistan, particularly, the ministry of information and culture to do their best in practicing the goal, said Hasanzada.
She praised the state-run media for its playing key role in monitoring the government performances alongside the private media and reflecting developments and failure of the government in any spheres.
The government dailies are like archived documentaries that help the youths at any times get access to any speeches of the country’s leaders if willing, added the deputy minister who asked for not only their removal but for additional support and financial aids by the government and the related organs.
Hasanzada lauded the government dailies for their struggle in reflecting the exact activities of the government and filling gaps between the people and the government, as he blamed some private media for exceeding beyond the country’s situations alongside their success to become mirrors of the government success and defections.
Naming each of the government dailies, with specified publications routine—The Anis—political, Hiwad—economic and Islah—national and social, she said the youths could get their favorite articles.
As the country’s only English paper, The Kabul Times is the expressive language of the Afghan government to the world, said Hasanzada.
According to her, law on access rights to information had been indorsed through a gathering attended by the journalist units, civil society and experts and with the soon approval the motive behind violence and threat against media works had been removed.
She asked the media for not missing time to release the law endorsement for soon practicing and urging for the release through the audio-visual and printing media. Journalists’ supporting fund has also been set within the ministry of information and culture, with the country’s national traders asked for financial support.
So far, the first-vice president granted some $10,000, Ata Mohammad, Balkh Governor donating $5,000 and Ofuq-e-Sharq Company to fund box and other institutions also provided some required cashes.
The deputy minister lauded the female journalists activities incomparable to those in some regional countries such as Iran, Bangladesh and Korea, as she blamed insecurity discrimination and lack of attention to the women rights to be behind their failure to work in media sphere.
But, in the neighboring countries, she said the women are admired as one of the key member of the society, she said expressing hope for more women active role in different fields. Suraya Raiszada