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War, violence forcing women journalists quit job in Afghanistan

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War, violence forcing women journalists quit job in Afghanistan
 The continuation of war 
and insecurity has forced wide number of female media workers leave jobs in media in the war-torn Afghanistan, Director of the Center for Protection of Women Journalists in Afghanistan said.
The findings of the Female Journalists Support Center in Afghanistan indicates that in recent years, particularly in the past one month, the presence of women journalists in media outlets has been under zero, in some provinces and this is more tangible in provinces, Nekzad told The Kabul Times.
The spreading out of war and an increase in the level of insecurity are the main reasons behind the reduction. Female journalists are more prone than male journalists to insecurity both in their work place as well as outside of their work.  
The findings of the Centre for the Protection of Afghan Women Journalists (CPAWJ)  is based on 74 interviews conducted by national and local media outlets (29 TVs, 35 radio stations, 4 news agencies, 6 print media such as newspapers, monthlies and magazines) and four journalists support centers or associations that includes the Afghan Journalists Safety Committee , AJSC, support Open Media in Afghanistan (NAI), Afghanistan’s Journalists National Union, ANJU and the Afghan Independent Journalists Association (AIJA). 

We believe that these national and local media outlets represent the whole media outlet community in Afghanistan. A total of 1037 women work in these organizations and out of this number, 474 of them are professional journalists. The findings confirm that Kabul, Herat and Balkh are the main hubs of journalists. Most of these women (150) journalists work in the Moby Group followed by 140 women journalists working with National Radio and Television, 55 women journalists work with Ariana Network, 54 women with Zan Tv ,50 women with Bano Radio and Television, 40 women with Killid Group, 40 with Shamshad Radio and Television and 38 with Khurshid Television.
Farida Nekzad, the director of the Centre for the Protection of Afghan Women Journalists (CPAWJ), says: “So far neitherdata on the number of women journalists and those who work with the media outlets in Afghanistan has been officially released by any government ministry, including the Ministry of Information and Culture, nor by any other organizations. 
CPAWJ took the initiative to obtain and release accurate data on the number of women journalists through various channels. We know that the given data is not complete and it is a minor step towards this goal and hereby we request all those journalists and societies which work in support of journalists to help complete the data.”
Keeping in view the problems and the increasing reduction of women journalists in Afghanistan, the Centre for the Protection of Afghan Women Journalists (CPAWJ) has set out as one of its main tasks to present, to whatever extent possible, a complete data on women journalists in Afghanistan. The absence of official data is one of the flaws for the newly established democracy in the country. The importance of the release of the data on women journalists in the country helps with knowing the exact numbers and it is also considered as the first step towards recognizing the problems they are faced with at their work place and society and to know their demands, she concluded. Absence of wage for both media men and women has added to the concerns about their harassment at the workplaces to force female media leave quit their jobs in media, according to the director.